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Is The Vampire Breast Lift A Good Idea To Create Cleavage?

Is The Vampire Breast Lift A Good Idea To Create Cleavage?

Remember the creepy vampire face lift that set the internet on fire? There’s a new trend sweeping plastic surgery that promises to plump up breasts using a patients’ own plasma-enhanced blood. The inventor of the vampire breast lift claims the procedure really works to create a better bust. But, there are plenty of skeptics who say don’t let bad advice drain your pocket book.

By Dawn Tongish

‘Vampire Breast Lift’

It’s easy to recall that eerie photo of Kim Kardashian and her blood-soaked selfie that made the vampire face lift a household name. During that technique blood is drawn, spun down, the platelet-plasma retrieved and then injected back into the face. If that isn’t enough to give you the ‘ick’ factor, then maybe seeing your appearance in the mirror after the procedure will make you go, ‘ew’.

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Fast forward and the technique is back, except for breasts this time. ER physician who practices  cosmetic procedures, Charles Runels is using the same approach to plump up breasts, calling it the vampire breast lift. According to media outlets, Runels says he has been able to fix certain deformities like inverted nipples and stretch marks, leaving the bust perkier from the procedure.

Still, it’s a tough sell with some plastic surgeons who aren’t buying the buzz. “Here we go again,” says Dr. Caroline Glicksman, who practices in New Jersey. She isn’t a believer in the idea that blood could boost the size of the bust. “They are basically taking off some of your blood, charging exorbitant amounts of money, reinjecting — spinning it down –and getting a little bit of platelets and injecting it into the breasts,” Glickman says it could be risky putting materials back into the breasts.

“From a plastic surgery standpoint, from a physician standpoint, you are injecting a substance into someone’s breast. We worry about long term consequences about injecting anything into a breast,” explains Glicksman.

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Blood and Boobs

So, are you asking yourself, ‘how does this work?’ The creator of the vampire breast lift says patients will have fuller looking breasts after the procedure where ‘blood is drawn, growth factors are isolated and then magically used to stimulate growth once those growth factors are reinserted into the breasts.’ The procedure takes about 15 minutes and costs $1800. Be advised, the investor says the procedure is no replacement for breast implants. You won’t look several cup sizes larger. There is no down time.  The creator says the look will be noticeable, with the full results taking about two months.

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None of it makes much sense to Drs. Ashley Gordon and Dustin Reid, both board certified plastic surgeons from Austin. “This is just non-sensical,” says Dr. Reid. Dr. Gordon agrees that the vampire breast lift doesn’t add up. “Totally non-sensical,” says Gordon.

Reid and Gordon question how much blood has to be drawn to plump up the breasts to make any noticeable difference. They also wonder if the inventor is promising a breast lift or an augmentation to his patients. They agree the jury is out on whether the procedure has the data to back up the claims.

Where’s The Proof That Blood Works?

“There’s just no evidence and data and no theoretical way that it could lift or do anything,” says Reid. “Sounds like he wants to accomplish more than lift, and provide augmentation.” The inventor does say that those seeking dramatic changes in bust size should seek breast implants over the vampire breast lift procedure. Doctors across the country are jumping on the bandwagon and offering the procedure to patients, who are willing to use their own blood to try and get bigger breasts. But, Dr. Gordon advises that inflating and deflating chest size could cause problems down the line.

“Injecting, making it bigger and then letting it get smaller and then injecting it again .. you are creating what weight fluctuations do and then possibly sag. That’s just a bad idea.” Despite the warnings, women are giving the vampire breast lift a try. But, as with any new procedure, it is always buyer beware so you don’t get bitten by bad medicine.

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