Chin Augmentation and Implants

Chin Augmentation and Implants

Chin augmentation, which is achieved through a surgical procedure called mentoplasty, or chin surgery, is used to build a larger chin and thereby create a better profile for the patient. Surgical implants are commonly used in chin augmentation. The idea is to have the underlying structure of the patient’s face altered for aesthetic purposes. Chin augmentation is often performed with a rhinoplasty to balance the proportions of the face.

Types of Implants

Implants commonly used for chin implants come from manufactured materials, such as silicone elastomers, porous polyethylene, and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (or ePTFE).
chin-implant-surgeryBecause of its biocompatibility and the fact that it does not harm the human body, ePTFE is frequently used in chin augmentation surgery. ePTFE is flexible soft and porous, but very strong.  It is inserted in trimmed sheets and held to the bone using titanium screws, and eventually held in place by bone and soft tissue growing through the implant. Another commonly used material is AlloDerm, a material derived from human tissue donors.

Implants can also be supplied via donation from the patient’s own bones, particularly from the ribs or the pelvis. Medical insiders have noted, though, that using donated bone for implant surgery, even when it’s the patient’s own bone,  can contribute to a high infection rate after surgery, even decades after the surgery is completed.

Chin Augmentation Procedure

For a chin augmentation, the patient is placed under general anesthesia or twilight IV (intravenous) sedation. During the procedure, incisions are made underneath the chin or in the mouth area where the lip skin and the gum meet. The implant is inserted through the incision and then properly positioned on the chin. The procedure lasts between 1 and 2 hours.

In some cases, chin augmentation can be done without implants. In this case chin augmentation is achieved by manipulating the jaw bone (mandibular), which often provides a more noticeable change than an implant. Although this procedure involves cutting the bone of the jaw, it can achieve results unattainable with implants alone.

Post-surgical Issues
After the chin augmentation, patients will feel mild pain that can be treated with pain medication.  Patients will have swelling for weeks or months, especially when screws are used to hold the implant in place. Scarring will depend on where incision is made, and will be mutually agreed upon by the surgeon and the patient. In addition, some patients can experience numbness for up to 3 months.

Within a few months after surgery, the results of the chin augmentation become more evident, and will remain throughout the patient’s lifetime.  When considering chin implant or mandibular advancement surgery, you should be aware of the options available to you and what works best for your particular case.

More in

Are You Cruisin' for a Bruisin'? - Cosmetic Procedures on the Cruise.

Are You Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’? – Cosmetic Procedures on the Cruise

Dawn TongishJanuary 18, 2019
No Spin Live Episode 56 - Restricted Textured Implants and 7 Trends for 2019

No Spin Live Episode 56 – Restricted Textured Implants and 7 Trends for 2019

Daniel A. Del Vecchio, MDJanuary 17, 2019
Making The Most of Your Breast Augmentation Revision Consultation.

Making The Most of Your Breast Augmentation Revision Consultation

Dawn TongishJanuary 16, 2019

No Spin Live: Australia Episode 4 – Sharks, BIA-ALCL, and Banned Textured Implants

Craig Layt, MDJanuary 15, 2019
Understanding Facial Symmetry.

Understanding Facial Symmetry

Dawn TongishJanuary 14, 2019
Are Skin Care Products Hype, or Will they Work?

Are Skin Care Products Hype, or Will they Work?

Dawn TongishJanuary 11, 2019

Introducing No Spin Live: Italy!

PSCJanuary 10, 2019
The Meghan Markle Nose - A Dream for Many.

The Meghan Markle Nose – A Dream for Many

Dawn TongishJanuary 9, 2019
No Spin Live Episode 55 - Medical Tourism, Devices Under Fire, and BIA-ALCL.

No Spin Live Episode 55 – Medical Tourism, Devices Under Fire, and BIA-ALCL

William P. Adams, Jr., MDJanuary 8, 2019